The Peculiar Place of Enlightenment Ideals in the Governance Concept of Citizenship and Democracy

GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION, Michael Peters, Harry Blee, Penny Enslin & Alan Britton, eds., SENSE Publishers, 2007

16 Pages Posted: 25 Dec 2011

See all articles by Robert Keith Shaw

Robert Keith Shaw

Guangdong University of Foreign Studies (GDUFS)

Date Written: December 6, 2007

Abstract

This chapter examines a foundational democratic practice by considering how it expresses concepts of the Enlightenment. The practice is that of the vote or plebiscite as it appears in governance. The leading enlightenment concept is rationality as it is expounded by Kant. Kant did not participate in national democratic processes. He expected decisions of any consequence to be made in Berlin and thrived when his City was invaded by the Russians and their officers became his students, until they left suddenly in 1762 (Kuehn, 2001, p.126). Kant participated in political debate where the issues were in the main constitutional and about the processes of government reform. He became known for his theory of natural law and the justification of positive law. He advocated the separation of powers, but denied the right of revolution. This latter onclusion was in apparent contradiction of his support for republicanism, including the French, English, and American revolutions (Beck, 1971, p.413). The term “republican” in Kant’s writings is sometimes interpreted to mean “parliamentary democracy”. This is probably a mistake, and Reiss suggests Kant’s term does not carry the “connotation” of modern Western democracy (Reiss's "Introduction" in Kant, 1991a, p.25). Kant himself wrote that he wanted to prevent “the republican constitution from being confused with the democratic one, as commonly happens” (Kant, 1991a, 100). So it is that, whilst Kant wrote about the interaction of morality and politics, he did not write on the topic of the present chapter which focuses on those mechanisms or mechanics that democracy displays when it works.

Suggested Citation

Shaw, Robert Keith, The Peculiar Place of Enlightenment Ideals in the Governance Concept of Citizenship and Democracy (December 6, 2007). GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION, Michael Peters, Harry Blee, Penny Enslin & Alan Britton, eds., SENSE Publishers, 2007. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1976773

Robert Keith Shaw (Contact Author)

Guangdong University of Foreign Studies (GDUFS) ( email )

广东外语外贸大学国际工商管理学院
院系楼356室
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006
China
137 105 90791 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://english.gdufs.edu.cn/

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