Obstacles and Opportunities to Improve Antiretroviral Regimen Access in Low-Income Countries

Current HIV/AIDS Reports, Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 161-167, August 2010

Northeastern University School of Law Research Paper No. 72-2012

Posted: 5 Jan 2012  

Jennifer Cohn

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases

Brook K. Baker

Northeastern University - School of Law

Date Written: August 1, 2010

Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests that dramatically increasing access to effective and well-tolerated antiretroviral medications is key to reversing the HIV pandemic. Currently used first-line therapies in developing countries have multiple toxicities that cause significant morbidity and mortality. New World Health Organization HIV treatment guidelines support earlier treatment initiation and the use of less toxic first-line therapies. Adoption of these guidelines requires political and financial commitment from multiple stakeholders including country governments and donors. This review summarizes the major adverse effects associated with commonly used ARV regimens in low-income countries and also analyzes some of the barriers and potential solutions that affect the ability of low-income countries to implement the new World Health Organization guidelines.

Keywords: Antiretroviral medication, low-income countries, medication pricing, universal access

Suggested Citation

Cohn, Jennifer and Baker, Brook K., Obstacles and Opportunities to Improve Antiretroviral Regimen Access in Low-Income Countries (August 1, 2010). Current HIV/AIDS Reports, Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 161-167, August 2010; Northeastern University School of Law Research Paper No. 72-2012. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1980121

Jennifer Cohn

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases ( email )

3400 Spruce Street
3rd Floor Silverstein, Suite D
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

Brook K. Baker (Contact Author)

Northeastern University - School of Law ( email )

400 Huntington Ave.
Boston, MA 02115
United States

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