Indigenous Sovereignty, Culture, and International Human Rights Law

South Atlantic Quarterly, Vol. 110, p. 403, Spring 2011

Suffolk University Law School Research Paper No. 12-04

26 Pages Posted: 6 Jan 2012 Last revised: 9 Jan 2012

See all articles by Lorie Graham

Lorie Graham

Suffolk University Law School

Siegfried Wiessner

St. Thomas University School of Law

Date Written: 2011

Abstract

Indigenous peoples' concept of sovereignty is intimately linked to their culture, their language, and their land. These three essential components of their self-determination have been, and remain, under existential threat. This essay explores how international law has responded to Indigenous peoples' demands for cultural survival, appraises progress made and suggests further improvements to the international legal regime. In doing so, the essay focuses on the 2007 UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, overwhelmingly passed by the UN General Assembly, as well as pertinent treaty and customary international law.

Suggested Citation

Graham, Lorie and Wiessner, Siegfried, Indigenous Sovereignty, Culture, and International Human Rights Law (2011). South Atlantic Quarterly, Vol. 110, p. 403, Spring 2011, Suffolk University Law School Research Paper No. 12-04, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1980835

Lorie Graham (Contact Author)

Suffolk University Law School ( email )

120 Tremont Street
Boston, MA 02108-4977
United States

Siegfried Wiessner

St. Thomas University School of Law ( email )

16401 N.W. 37th Ave.
Miami, FL 33054
United States

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