Toward a Lockean Theory of Intellectual Property

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY: MORAL, LEGAL, AND INTERNATIONAL DILEMMAS, p. 81, A. Moore, ed., Rowman & Littlefield, 1997

23 Pages Posted: 7 Jan 2012 Last revised: 9 Mar 2018

See all articles by Adam D. Moore

Adam D. Moore

University of Washington - The Information School

Date Written: 1997

Abstract

In what follows, a Lockean theory of intellectual property rights will be explained and defended. In part, I will argue that the non-rivalrous nature of intellectual property, mentioned above, does not pose an insurmountable problem for the Lockean. The first part will consist of a protracted argument, grounded in the Lockean proviso, that seeks to justify individual acts of intellectual property appropriation. In the second part, I will examine how an institution or system of intellectual property might be justified, rather than justifying individual instances of intellectual property acquisition directly. Finally, if successful, my theory will support the original intuition that something ethically wrong has occurred when computer software, music, or other intellectual works are pirated.

Suggested Citation

Moore, Adam D., Toward a Lockean Theory of Intellectual Property (1997). INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY: MORAL, LEGAL, AND INTERNATIONAL DILEMMAS, p. 81, A. Moore, ed., Rowman & Littlefield, 1997. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1980889

Adam D. Moore (Contact Author)

University of Washington - The Information School ( email )

Box 352840
Mary Gates Hall, Ste. 370
Seattle, WA 98195
206.685.9937 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://ischool.uw.edu

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