The Human Right to Water in Israel: A Case Study of the Unrecognized Bedouin Villages in the Negev

Israel Law Review, Volume 46, Issue 01, pp 25-59

Posted: 20 Jan 2012 Last revised: 27 May 2014

See all articles by Sharmila Murthy

Sharmila Murthy

Suffolk University Law School

Mark K. Williams

Independent

Elisha Baskin

Harvard University - Carr Center for Human Rights Policy

Date Written: March 5, 2013

Abstract

In the case 9535/06 Abadallah Abu Massad and Others v Water Commissioner and Israel Lands Administration (2011), the Israeli Supreme Court ruled that the right to water deserves constitutional protection under Israel's Basic Law: Human Dignity and Freedom. The Court also found support for the right to water under both international human rights law and Israeli statutory law. At the same time, the Court held that the right to water is not absolute but must be balanced against the rights of the state. The case was brought by residents of unrecognised Bedouin villages in the Negev, a desert region in southern Israel, who do not have access to household water. The Court found that in exercising its discretion regarding additional water access points, the Israeli Water Authority could consider the ‘illegal’ nature of these villages. Applying the criteria of reasonableness and proportionality, the Court ultimately affirmed the Israeli Water Authority's policy in unrecognised villages in the Negev. Despite this administrative deference, the invocation of constitutional and international human rights law raises the level of scrutiny that should be applied to a review of the Israeli Water Authority's exercise of discretion. The Court's opinion is coloured and influenced by long-standing land disputes between the indigenous Bedouin population and the State of Israel. Drawing on empirical research conducted in December 2011, the analysis attempts to place the Abu Massad decision in its proper historical and political context. The dispute over land in the Negev can be traced back to the days of the Ottoman Empire. More recent efforts by the Israeli government as set out in the Goldberg Report and the Prawer Plan, and the international community's response to these efforts, are discussed. In light of the history and current political context, it may be prudent for the Israeli Water Authority to re-assess the effectiveness of its existing water policy in unrecognised Bedouin villages in the Negev.

Keywords: human right to water, Israel, Bedouins, unrecognized village, Negev, Naqab, Goldberg Report, Prawer Plan

Suggested Citation

Murthy, Sharmila and Williams, Mark K. and Baskin, Elisha, The Human Right to Water in Israel: A Case Study of the Unrecognized Bedouin Villages in the Negev (March 5, 2013). Israel Law Review, Volume 46, Issue 01, pp 25-59. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1988357 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1988357

Sharmila Murthy (Contact Author)

Suffolk University Law School ( email )

120 Tremont Street
Boston, MA 02108-4977
United States

Mark K. Williams

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

Elisha Baskin

Harvard University - Carr Center for Human Rights Policy ( email )

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
1,576
PlumX Metrics