Restricting CPR to Patients Who Provide Informed Consent Will Not Permit Physicians to Unilaterally Refuse Requested CPR

American Journal of Bioethics, Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 82-83, 2010

Posted: 27 Feb 2012  

Thaddeus Mason Pope

Mitchell Hamline School of Law; Queensland University of Technology - Australian Health Law Research Center; Saint Georges University; Alden March Bioethics Institute

Date Written: January 1, 2010

Abstract

Bishop and colleagues (Am. J. Bioethics 2010) are rightly critical of presumed in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). But their analysis is plagued by a fundamental conflation. On the one hand, Bishop and colleagues devote significant space to targeting the 'presumption that CPR/ACLS will be performed.' On the other hand, they enthusiastically commend the UK model, which permits providers to unilaterally refuse patient- or surrogate-requested CPR. Bishop and colleagues suggest that these two distinct subjects are fused in such a way that getting rid of the CPR presumption will bring us to the UK model.

However, this author believes this is false. The relationship between the presumption and the UK model is actually far flimsier and weaker than Bishop and colleagues advance. Even without the presumption, U.S. patients and surrogates may (and will) continue to demand CPR. So, even without the presumption, U.S. providers will still 'feel coerced into applying medical interventions that may not be medically indicated.' This article addresses the presumptions in the U.S. about providing in-hospital CPR. It also draws a connection with the UK model of CPR presumption.

Keywords: CPR, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, hospital, healthcare, ACLS, surrogate, statutorily mandated, DNAR, UK, United Kingdom

JEL Classification: K32

Suggested Citation

Pope, Thaddeus Mason, Restricting CPR to Patients Who Provide Informed Consent Will Not Permit Physicians to Unilaterally Refuse Requested CPR (January 1, 2010). American Journal of Bioethics, Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 82-83, 2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2003522

Thaddeus Mason Pope (Contact Author)

Mitchell Hamline School of Law ( email )

875 Summit Avenue
Room 320
Saint Paul, MN 55105
United States
651-695-7661 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.thaddeuspope.com

Queensland University of Technology - Australian Health Law Research Center ( email )

2 George Street
Brisbane, Queensland 4000
Australia

Saint Georges University ( email )

West Indies
Grenada

HOME PAGE: http://www.thaddeuspope.com

Alden March Bioethics Institute ( email )

47 New Scotland Ave
MC 153
Albany, NY 12208
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.thaddeuspope.com

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
386