Cultural Narratives of the Legal Profession: Law School, Scamblogs, Hopelessness and the Rule of Law

20 Pages Posted: 14 Feb 2012

See all articles by Daniel D. Barnhizer

Daniel D. Barnhizer

Michigan State University College of Law

Date Written: February 7, 2012

Abstract

This essay discusses the potential impacts of the narratives that lawyers, law student, legal educators, and others use to define what it means to be part of the legal profession on the lawyer's traditional role as a conservator of the rule of law and other legal institutions. While cultural narratives about the law have always included legal mythologies of long hours, difficult partners and clients, and the dedication required to practice law, more recent narratives such as legal “scamblogs," and oral traditions among students seem to signal a marked shift to failure stories based in despondency, despair, and anger. Whether these recent narratives will dominate the culture of lawyering remains to be seen, but the proliferation of these types of stories potentially threatens the willingness of current and future lawyers to participate in a rule of law system that appears to cheat them of both their careers and their future happiness.

Keywords: scamblog, legal profession, legal education, narrative

Suggested Citation

Barnhizer, Daniel D., Cultural Narratives of the Legal Profession: Law School, Scamblogs, Hopelessness and the Rule of Law (February 7, 2012). MSU Legal Studies Research Paper No. 10-01, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2004597 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2004597

Daniel D. Barnhizer (Contact Author)

Michigan State University College of Law ( email )

318 Law College Building
East Lansing, MI 48824-1300
United States
517-432-6901 (Phone)

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