Lessons from Positive Psychology for Developing Advocacy Skills

John Marshall Law Journal, Vol. VI, No. 1, p.103, 2013

Chapman University Law Research Paper No. 12-8

38 Pages Posted: 8 Apr 2012 Last revised: 29 Apr 2013

See all articles by Nancy Schultz

Nancy Schultz

Chapman University, The Dale E. Fowler School of Law

Date Written: February 17, 2012

Abstract

Advocacy skills are crucial to law students and lawyers. One of the ways law students develop those skills is in the context of lawyering skills competitions. Coaching advocacy teams is something many of us do by instinct and experience. This article explores whether there is any psychological research that might offer more systematic guidance for advocacy coaches. Positive psychology does offer some principles that suggest useful approaches to coaching. Taken together with the aforementioned instinct and experience, these principles can help coaches be more effective in training young lawyers for litigation and dispute resolution practice.

Keywords: legal education, coaching, advocacy, dispute resolution, psychology

Suggested Citation

Schultz, Nancy, Lessons from Positive Psychology for Developing Advocacy Skills (February 17, 2012). John Marshall Law Journal, Vol. VI, No. 1, p.103, 2013; Chapman University Law Research Paper No. 12-8 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2007212 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2007212

Nancy Schultz (Contact Author)

Chapman University, The Dale E. Fowler School of Law ( email )

One University Drive
Orange, CA 92866

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