Sudden Spikes in Global Risk

HKIMR Working Paper No.06/2012

Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper No. 13-36

34 Pages Posted: 6 Mar 2012 Last revised: 24 Jul 2019

See all articles by Philippe Bacchetta

Philippe Bacchetta

University of Lausanne; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); Swiss Finance Institute

Eric van Wincoop

University of Virginia - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: February 29, 2012

Abstract

Recent episodes (October 2008, May 2010, August 2011) have witnessed huge spikes in equity price risk (implied volatility). Apart from their large size, several features characterize these risk panics. They are global phenomena, shared among a broad set of countries. There is substantial variation though in the extent to which individual countries are impacted, while the impact bears little relation to financial linkages with the epicenter of the crisis. In addition there is usually not a large shock to fundamentals that sets off these panics. We provide an explanation for these risk panic features in the context of a two-country model that allows for self-fulfilling shifts in risk.

Suggested Citation

Bacchetta, Philippe and van Wincoop, Eric, Sudden Spikes in Global Risk (February 29, 2012). HKIMR Working Paper No.06/2012, Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper No. 13-36, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2015868 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2015868

Philippe Bacchetta

University of Lausanne ( email )

Faculty of Business and Economics
Internef 523
1015 Lausanne
Switzerland

HOME PAGE: http://www.hec.unil.ch/pbacchetta/

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

Swiss Finance Institute

c/o University of Geneva
40, Bd du Pont-d'Arve
CH-1211 Geneva 4
Switzerland

Eric Van Wincoop (Contact Author)

University of Virginia - Department of Economics ( email )

Rouss Hall 114
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Charlottesville, VA 22904-4182
United States
804-924-3997 (Phone)
804-982-2904 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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