A Randomized Controlled Trial of Tai Chi for Tension Headaches

Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 1, pp. 107-113, 2007

7 Pages Posted: 9 Mar 2012  

Ryan Abbott

University of Surrey School of Law; University of California, Los Angeles - David Geffen School of Medicine

Date Written: August 12, 2006

Abstract

This study examined whether a traditional low-impact mind–body exercise, Tai Chi, affects health related quality-of-life (HRQOL) and headache impact in an adult population suffering from tension-type headaches. Forty-seven participants were randomly assigned to either a 15 week intervention program of Tai Chi instruction or a wait-list control group. HRQOL (SF-36v2) and headache status (HIT-6) were obtained at baseline and at 5, 10 and 15 weeks post-baseline during the intervention period. Statistically significant (P < 0.05) improvements in favor of the intervention were present for the HIT score and the SF-36 pain, energy/fatigue, social functioning, emotional well-being and mental health summary scores. A 15 week intervention of Tai Chi practice was effective in reducing headache impact and also effective in improving perceptions of some aspects of physical and mental health.

Keywords: Complementary and alternative medicine, health-related quality-of-life, integrative medicine, Tai Chi, tension-type headache, traditional Chinese medicine

Suggested Citation

Abbott, Ryan, A Randomized Controlled Trial of Tai Chi for Tension Headaches (August 12, 2006). Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 1, pp. 107-113, 2007 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2017806

Ryan Benjamin Abbott (Contact Author)

University of Surrey School of Law ( email )

Guildford
Guildford, Surrey GU2 5XH
United Kingdom

University of California, Los Angeles - David Geffen School of Medicine ( email )

1000 Veteran Avenue, Box 956939
Los Angeles, CA 90095-6939
United States

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