Earnings Growth versus Measures of Income and Education for Predicting Mortality

36 Pages Posted: 16 Mar 2012

See all articles by Harriet Orcutt Duleep

Harriet Orcutt Duleep

College of William & Mary - Policy School; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

David A. Jaeger

Ph.D. Program in Economics, City University of New York Graduate Center; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); University of Cologne - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics; CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute); University College London - CReAM - Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration

Date Written: September 1, 2011

Abstract

This paper begins an exploration to determine whether earnings growth, as a measure of the propensity to invest in human capital, is a valuable variable for predicting mortality. To insure its robustness and general applicability to ongoing Social Security models, the usefulness of earnings growth as a predictor of mortality will be explored in multiple time periods. This paper begins that process by reporting preliminary results for an early time period using the 1973 CPS-SSA-IRS Exact Match file. In addition to presenting preliminary results, the paper also describes how data challenges associated with the pre-1978 administrative record data on earnings and mortality are met.

Keywords: mortality, earnings, income, education

Suggested Citation

Duleep, Harriet Orcutt and Jaeger, David A., Earnings Growth versus Measures of Income and Education for Predicting Mortality (September 1, 2011). Michigan Retirement Research Center Research Paper No. 2010-257. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2022007 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2022007

Harriet Orcutt Duleep (Contact Author)

College of William & Mary - Policy School ( email )

P.O. Box 8795
Williamsburg, VA 23185
United States

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

David A. Jaeger

Ph.D. Program in Economics, City University of New York Graduate Center ( email )

NBER
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New York, NY 10004
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.djaeger.org

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

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University of Cologne - Department of Economics ( email )

Cologne, 50923
Germany

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

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Bonn, 53113
Germany

HOME PAGE: http://www.iza.org

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute) ( email )

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

University College London - CReAM - Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration ( email )

Drayton House
30 Gordon Street
London, WC1H 0AX
United Kingdom

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