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Take Two Aspirin and Call Me after the Election - Responding to R. Alta Charo: 'Warning: Contraceptive Drugs May Cause Political Headaches'

Perspective, New England Journal of Medicine, March 2012

3 Pages Posted: 27 Mar 2012  

Sean T. Murphy

Protection of Conscience Project

Date Written: March 14, 2012

Abstract

Consistent with her previous service to the President, Professor Charo observes that the Obama administration will ‘win’ if the current controversy can be framed as a dispute about contraceptives, and then loyally attempts to do just that.

“Let’s recognize,” she writes, “that the current debate is about public health and contraception.”

Actually, at root, the current debate is about who should pay for contraceptives. The policy of the Obama administration is that women who use contraceptives should not have to pay for them. Unfortunately, contraceptives cost money. If women are not to pay for them, someone else must do so.

It is possible to achieve the administration’s goal of having someone else pay for women’s contraceptives without forcing unwilling religious believers to foot the bill, without becoming entangled in complex and contentious evaluations of moral complicity, and without triggering legal challenges under the First Amendment.

Keywords: freedom of conscience, contraception, Health and Human Services

Suggested Citation

Murphy, Sean T., Take Two Aspirin and Call Me after the Election - Responding to R. Alta Charo: 'Warning: Contraceptive Drugs May Cause Political Headaches' (March 14, 2012). Perspective, New England Journal of Medicine, March 2012. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2029197

Sean Murphy (Contact Author)

Protection of Conscience Project ( email )

7120 Tofino St.
Powell River, Ontario V8A 1G3
Canada
604-485-9765 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.consciencelaws.org

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