The Somali Piracy Challenge: Operational Partnering, the Rule of Law, and Capacity Building

25 Pages Posted: 2 Apr 2012

See all articles by Brian Wilson

Brian Wilson

United States Navy; United States Coast Guard

Date Written: 2011

Abstract

The threat of piracy is emblematic of an emerging, and asymmetric, security challenge involving non-state actors. But it is not the only maritime threat. Drug trafficking, human smuggling, fishing incursions, oil poaching and the transport of illicit cargo, including weapons of mass destruction are critical concerns as well.

Ensuring that those who criminally exploit the oceans are held accountable requires navigating complex legal, jurisdictional and operational issues, as well as securing political, judicial and diplomatic support. Challenges with transnational threats could include the pursuit of money in financial institutions scattered across multiple nations to domestic and international information sharing between law enforcement/intelligence personnel.

Keywords: piracy, Somalia, maritime security, maritime threat, Al-Shabaab, asymmetric, kinetic, CTF-151, Navy, Coast Guard, East Africa, Africa, mother ship, United Nations, Monitoring Group, United Nations Security Council Resolution, hostages, Gulf of Aden, cooperation, Maritime Operational Threat Response

JEL Classification: K14, K4

Suggested Citation

Wilson, Brian, The Somali Piracy Challenge: Operational Partnering, the Rule of Law, and Capacity Building (2011). Loyola University Chicago International Law Review, Vol. 9, No. 1, p. 45, 2011. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2032035

Brian Wilson (Contact Author)

United States Navy ( email )

Washington, DC
United States

United States Coast Guard ( email )

United States

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