Evaluation of Edamame Cultivars in New Jersey and Maryland

5 Pages Posted: 4 Apr 2012

See all articles by Laura Hunsberger

Laura Hunsberger

Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center

Jim Simon

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Department of Plant Biology and Pathology

William Sciarappa

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Diandian Shen

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Qing-Li Wu

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Brian Hulme

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: 2007

Abstract

Edible soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr., Fabaceae] are growing in popularity as a specialty vegetable crop. Soybeans can be processed into many types of protein rich foods. Asians consume fresh or salted edamame much as Americans consume peas and peanuts. The increase of soy products in the news, touting their health benefits, has increased the public’s awareness of this traditional Asian vegetable (Sciarappa and Quinn 2004). In order to develop production information for growers of this new crop, organic cultivar trials were conducted in New Jersey and Maryland (2002–2005), to determine suitability in the Mid-Atlantic region.

Edamame has large seeds, a light colored hilum, green seed coat and high sugar content. It is traditionally cultivated in China, Japan, and other Asian countries because it provides an excellent substitute for animal based protein that avoids saturated fats and cholesterol. These beans contain from 30% to 40% protein and are rich in calcium, vitamin A, and phytoestrogens, which may reduce the incidence of menopausal symptoms (hot flashes, night sweats).

Conventional edamame yields can be variable, ranging from 6,840-11,400 kg/ha (Miles et al. 2000). However, commercial growing has its limitations, including inconsistent plant populations, lack of commercial harvesting options, seed size variability, and effects of geographic microclimates (Duppong and Hatterman-Valenti 2005).

Suggested Citation

Hunsberger, Laura and Simon, Jim and Sciarappa, William and Shen, Diandian and Wu, Qing-Li and Hulme, Brian, Evaluation of Edamame Cultivars in New Jersey and Maryland (2007). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2032208 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2032208

Laura Hunsberger (Contact Author)

Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center ( email )

Cornell Univ. LIREC
3059 Sound Avenue
Riverhead, NY 11901
United States
631-727-3595 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.longislandhort.cornell.edu/

Jim Simon

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Department of Plant Biology and Pathology ( email )

59 Dudley Road
Foran Hall Room 396C
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8520
United States

William Sciarappa

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

Diandian Shen

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

Qing-Li Wu

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

Brian Hulme

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

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