Crossing Party Lines: The Effects of Information on Redistributive Politics

63 Pages Posted: 14 Apr 2012 Last revised: 13 Jan 2016

See all articles by Katherine Casey

Katherine Casey

Stanford Graduate School of Business

Date Written: February 24, 2015

Abstract

Many lament that weak accountability and poor governance impede economic development in Africa. Politicians rely on ethnic allegiances that deliver the vote irrespective of performance, dampening electoral incentives. Giving voters information about candidate competence counters ethnic loyalty and strengthens accountability. I extend a canonical electoral model to show how information provision áows through voter behavior and ultimately impacts the distribution of political spending. I test the theory on data from Sierra Leone using decentralization and differential radio coverage to identify informationís effects. Estimates suggest that information increases voting across ethnic-party lines and induces a more equitable allocation of campaign spending.

JEL Classification: D72, O17, H41

Suggested Citation

Casey, Katherine, Crossing Party Lines: The Effects of Information on Redistributive Politics (February 24, 2015). Stanford University Graduate School of Business Research Paper No. 16-2. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2039546 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2039546

Katherine Casey (Contact Author)

Stanford Graduate School of Business ( email )

655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5015
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
143
Abstract Views
932
rank
207,020
PlumX Metrics