Slow Down! Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Avoidable Satiation

60 Pages Posted: 3 May 2012  

Jeff Galak

Carnegie Mellon University

Justin Kruger

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; New York University (NYU); New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing

George Loewenstein

Carnegie Mellon University - Department of Social and Decision Sciences

Date Written: May 2, 2012

Abstract

Consumers often choose how quickly to consume things they enjoy. The research presented here demonstrates that they tend to consume too rapidly, growing tired of initially well-liked stimuli such as a favorite snack (experiments 1 and 4) or an enjoyable video game (experiments 2 and 3) more quickly than they would if they slowed consumption. The results also demonstrate that such overly-rapid consumption results from a failure to appreciate that longer breaks between consumption episodes slow satiation. The results present a paradox: Participants who choose their own rate of consumption experience less pleasure than those who have a slower rate of consumption chosen for them.

Keywords: satiation, consumers, habituation, hedonic, enjoyment

Suggested Citation

Galak, Jeff and Kruger, Justin and Loewenstein, George, Slow Down! Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Avoidable Satiation (May 2, 2012). Journal of Consumer Research, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2050035

Jeff Galak (Contact Author)

Carnegie Mellon University ( email )

Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
United States
412-268-5810 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.jeffgalak.com

Justin Kruger

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ( email )

601 E John St
Champaign, IL 61820
United States

New York University (NYU) ( email )

Bobst Library, E-resource Acquisitions
20 Cooper Square 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10003-711
United States

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing ( email )

Henry Kaufman Ctr
44 W 4 St.
New York, NY
United States

George F. Loewenstein

Carnegie Mellon University - Department of Social and Decision Sciences ( email )

Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
United States
412-268-8787 (Phone)
412-268-6938 (Fax)

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