Abusing the Trade Laws: An Antitrust Perspective

Law & Policy in International Business, Vol. 17, p. 487, 1985

32 Pages Posted: 19 May 2012

See all articles by Spencer Weber Waller

Spencer Weber Waller

Loyola University Chicago School of Law

Date Written: May 18, 1985

Abstract

The U.S. trade laws provide domestic firms with remedies against foreign firms which employ unfair trade practices. A party can initiate an antidumping or countervailing duty proceeding simply by filing a petition alleging that it has been injured by foreign competition. Normally, petitions for relief under the trade laws should not subject domestic firms to antitrust liability. However, firms which enter collusive settlements with foreign competitors and bring frivolous trade actions for collateral purposes should not escape antitrust scrutiny. This article examines the antitrust risks firms face when they abuse the trade laws, and the application of the Noerr-Pennington and sham litigation doctrines to the bringing of trade actions.

Keywords: antitrust, Sherman Act, collusion, monopolization, attempted monopolization, settlement agreements, antidumping duties, dumping, subsidies, countervailing duties, import relief, Commerce Department, Noerr-Pennington, sham litigation

JEL Classification: D40, F13, K21, L10, L40

Suggested Citation

Waller, Spencer Weber, Abusing the Trade Laws: An Antitrust Perspective (May 18, 1985). Law & Policy in International Business, Vol. 17, p. 487, 1985. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2062565

Spencer Weber Waller (Contact Author)

Loyola University Chicago School of Law ( email )

25 E Pearson St.
Room 1041
Chicago, IL 60611
United States
312-915-7137 (Phone)
312-915-7201 (Fax)

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