Income Inequality and Health: Lessons from a Refugee Residential Assignment Program

44 Pages Posted: 26 May 2012

See all articles by Hans Gronqvist

Hans Gronqvist

Stockholm University

Per Johansson

IFAU - Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluation; Uppsala University - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Susan Niknami

Stockholm University

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of income inequality on health for a group of particularly disadvantaged individuals: refugees. Our analysis draws on longitudinal hospitalization records coupled with a settlement policy where Swedish authorities assigned newly arrived refugees to their first area of residence. The policy was implemented in a way that provides a source of plausibly random variation in initial location. The results reveal no statistically significant effect of income inequality on the risk of being hospitalized. This finding holds also for most population subgroups and when separating between different types of diagnoses. Our estimates are precise enough to rule out large effects of income inequality on health.

Keywords: income inequality, immigration, quasi-experiment

JEL Classification: I10, J15

Suggested Citation

Gronqvist, Hans and Johansson, Per and Niknami, Susan, Income Inequality and Health: Lessons from a Refugee Residential Assignment Program. IZA Discussion Paper No. 6554, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2066977

Hans Gronqvist (Contact Author)

Stockholm University ( email )

Universitetsvägen 10
Stockholm, Stockholm SE-106 91
Sweden

Per Johansson

IFAU - Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluation ( email )

Box 513
751 20 Uppsala
Sweden
+ 46 18 471 70 86 (Phone)
+ 46 18 471 70 71 (Fax)

Uppsala University - Department of Economics ( email )

Uppsala, 751 20
Sweden

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Susan Niknami

Stockholm University ( email )

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