Charles Taylor, Arms Dealers, and Reparations

JURIST, Academic Commentary, June 2012

UALR Bowen School Research Paper No. 12-08

6 Pages Posted: 7 Jun 2012 Last revised: 28 May 2013

See all articles by Kenneth S. Gallant

Kenneth S. Gallant

University of Arkansas at Little Rock - William H. Bowen School of Law

Date Written: June 7, 2012

Abstract

This short piece makes two arguments: 1. The verdict against Charles Taylor in the Trial Chamber of the Special Court for Sierra Leone is historic. It convicted him principally of aiding and abetting the mass violence, largely through the trade of arms for so-called conflict diamonds. The verdict held that someone who sells arms into a conflict knowing that they will be used to commit war crimes and crimes against humanity commits a crime. 2. The sentence against Taylor, consisting solely of imprisonment, was disappointing. The Court did not use its authority under the SCSL Statute to order forfeiture of the proceeds of Taylor's crime. Such an order could have contributed to deterring other arms dealers from selling into similar situations, and might have provided resources for reparations to the victims of his crimes.

Keywords: arms dealers, reparations, aiding and abetting, Sierra Leone, Charles Taylor, international criminal sentencing

Suggested Citation

Gallant, Kenneth S., Charles Taylor, Arms Dealers, and Reparations (June 7, 2012). JURIST, Academic Commentary, June 2012; UALR Bowen School Research Paper No. 12-08. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2079768

Kenneth S. Gallant (Contact Author)

University of Arkansas at Little Rock - William H. Bowen School of Law ( email )

1201 McMath Street
Little Rock, AR 72202
United States
501-324-9912 (Phone)

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