The Devil Drives a Lada: The Social Construction of Hackers as the Cybercriminal

THE CONSTRUCTION OF CRIME, C. Gregoriou ed., (Palgrave Macmillan) 2012

11 Pages Posted: 13 Jun 2012

See all articles by David S. Wall

David S. Wall

University of Leeds, Centre for Criminal Justice Studies

Date Written: June 13, 2012

Abstract

The roots of cybercrime, it will be argued in this chapter, are cultural rather than scientific, and shape the way that we view and react societally to online deviance. It is important to understand this relationship because it also frames legal and policy responses to cybercrime. The first part of this chapter will emphasise the normative nature of the term cybercrime. The second part will explore the role of cyberpunk literature in developing the basic cultural conceptualisation of cybercrime. The third part will look at the way those concepts have been strengthened in hacker-related movies and medias. The fourth part will show how the hacker narrative has been strengthened by dystopic fiction and then perpetuated by the culture of fear and flaws in the news production process.

Keywords: cybercrime, cyberpunk, hacker films

JEL Classification: LS2, K10, K19

Suggested Citation

Wall, David S., The Devil Drives a Lada: The Social Construction of Hackers as the Cybercriminal (June 13, 2012). THE CONSTRUCTION OF CRIME, C. Gregoriou ed., (Palgrave Macmillan) 2012. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2083833

David S. Wall (Contact Author)

University of Leeds, Centre for Criminal Justice Studies ( email )

School of Law, Liberty Building
University of Leeds
Leeds, West Yorkshire LS2 9JT
United Kingdom
+44 113 343 9575 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.leeds.ac.uk/people/staff/wall/

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