Does Temporary Geographical Proximity Predict Learning? Knowledge Dynamics in the Olympic Games

Forthcoming in Regional Studies

38 Pages Posted: 17 Jun 2012 Last revised: 17 Apr 2014

See all articles by Martin Müller

Martin Müller

University of Lausanne

Allison Stewart

University of Oxford; University of Oxford - Said Business School

Date Written: April 17, 2014

Abstract

Temporary geographical proximity in the form of face-to-face contact is commonly thought to enhance learning. In a sample of individuals (n= 294) involved in knowledge transfer in the Olympic Games, temporary geographical proximity emerges as a rather weak predictor of learning, although its explanatory value improves when coupled with organised proximity. This association disappears, however, when controlling for other predictors, suggesting that there is no unique effect of temporary geographical proximity on learning. Part of the effect of temporary geographical proximity is mediated through other variables, urging further research into the paths of mediation. Several practical implications for knowledge transfer in mega-events result.

Keywords: proximity, learning, knowledge transfer, mega-events, Olympic Games

JEL Classification: D83, L30, L83

Suggested Citation

Müller, Martin and Stewart, Allison, Does Temporary Geographical Proximity Predict Learning? Knowledge Dynamics in the Olympic Games (April 17, 2014). Forthcoming in Regional Studies, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2085308 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2085308

Martin Müller (Contact Author)

University of Lausanne ( email )

Quartier Chambronne
Lausanne, Vaud CH-1015
Switzerland

Allison Stewart

University of Oxford ( email )

Mansfield Road
Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 4AU
United Kingdom

University of Oxford - Said Business School ( email )

Park End Street
Oxford, OX1 1HP
Great Britain

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