How to Say 'No': Conviction and Identity Attributions in Persuasive Refusal

International Journal of Research in Marketing, Forthcoming

Posted: 21 Jun 2012

See all articles by Vanessa Patrick

Vanessa Patrick

University of Houston - C.T. Bauer College of Business

Henrik Hagtvedt

Boston College - Department of Marketing

Date Written: 2012

Abstract

This research investigates the influence of refusal frames on persuasiveness in an interpersonal context. Specifically, the refusal frame “I don’t” is more persuasive than the refusal frame “I can’t” because the former connotes conviction to a higher degree. This perceived conviction is tied to the identity-signaling function of the refusal frame. Two studies demonstrate that 1) the “don’t” frame is more persuasive than the “can’t” frame, 2) perceived conviction mediates the influence of refusal frame on persuasiveness, and 3) attributions to the refuser’s identity explain perceived conviction.

Suggested Citation

Patrick, Vanessa and Hagtvedt, Henrik, How to Say 'No': Conviction and Identity Attributions in Persuasive Refusal (2012). International Journal of Research in Marketing, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2086838

Vanessa Patrick (Contact Author)

University of Houston - C.T. Bauer College of Business ( email )

Houston, TX 77204-6021
United States

Henrik Hagtvedt

Boston College - Department of Marketing ( email )

Fulton Hall 450D
140 Commonwealth Ave
Chestnut Hill, MA 02467
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.bc.edu/schools/csom/faculty/bios/hagtvedt.html

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