A Look at John Chamberlain’s Lacquer Paintings

It's All in the Fit: The Work of John Chamberlain (Marfa, Tex.: Chinati Foundation, 2009), pp. 85-118

36 Pages Posted: 4 Feb 2020

See all articles by Adrian Kohn

Adrian Kohn

Massachusetts College of Art and Design

Date Written: October 1, 2009

Abstract

Knowledge founded on perception always stays flexible. Imposed intellectual interpretations remain rigid, eliminating discrepancies if sensations vary from that which is expected. When viewing art, as with everyday existence in the world, a willingness to just perceive means learning, again and again, what one did not know before, even though things seem perplexing at first. John Chamberlain recognized this potential, claiming that “a work of art can give you a lot [of] things you don’t need. But you can also savor it and keep it in reserve because tomorrow you may need it.' Discovery begins with an intuitive insight but it takes careful looking and thinking to gauge new information’s similarity, difference, or distinction of degree from current understanding. As intellect admits exceptions, one adjusts trusted generalizations and, in so doing, learns. To learn one must discover and to discover one must perceive.

Keywords: John Chamberlain, Donald Judd, Adrian Kohn, Willem de Kooning

Suggested Citation

Kohn, Adrian, A Look at John Chamberlain’s Lacquer Paintings (October 1, 2009). It's All in the Fit: The Work of John Chamberlain (Marfa, Tex.: Chinati Foundation, 2009), pp. 85-118, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2088694

Adrian Kohn (Contact Author)

Massachusetts College of Art and Design ( email )

621 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
United States

HOME PAGE: http://massart.edu/faculty-staff/list/6236

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