Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights: The Emergence of a Rule of Customary International Law from United Nations Resolutions

24 Pages Posted: 26 Jun 2012

See all articles by Joseph M. Isanga

Joseph M. Isanga

Concordia University School of Law

Date Written: January 26, 2009

Abstract

Although the United Nations currently has no agreed-upon definition of terrorism, the author argues that it is nonetheless possible to hold States engaged in counter-terrorism efforts liable for violations of international human rights law even when they are not signatories to relevant international treaties. The basis for such an obligation derives from various resolutions of the United Nations and decisions of national courts which represent a step toward the codification of a general obligation to protect human rights in the context of counter-terrorism as an emerging rule of customary international law.

Keywords: terrorism, international human rights, UN resolutions, customary international law

Suggested Citation

Isanga, Joseph, Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights: The Emergence of a Rule of Customary International Law from United Nations Resolutions (January 26, 2009). Denver Journal of International Law and Policy, Vol. 37, No. 2, 2009, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2093414

Joseph Isanga (Contact Author)

Concordia University School of Law ( email )

501 W. Front St
Boise, ID 83702
United States
208-639-5411 (Phone)

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
190
Abstract Views
816
rank
205,918
PlumX Metrics