Book Review of Catherine Barnard and Okeoghene Odudu, the Outer Limits of European Union Law

European Law Review, pp. 794-796, 2009

21 Pages Posted: 3 Jul 2012

See all articles by Christina Eckes

Christina Eckes

Amsterdam Centre for European Law and Governance

Date Written: August 2009

Abstract

The criticism of the perceived 'competence creep' of the European Union is not new. The book, The Outer Limits of European Union Law (comprising an introduction and 15 chapters) sheds some light on the validity of this criticism. It is persuasive in its claim that there are ultimate limits to the European Union’s competence and reveals both the strengths and the weaknesses of these limits. The book addresses the limits of EU law from three angles. First, the book seeks to draw these limits in different policy areas (citizenship, police co-operation, free movement provisions, etc.). Secondly, it addresses broader questions of legitimacy and the nature of the integrated European legal order. Thirdly, it discusses specific mechanisms (Art.308 EC), principles (proportionality, subsidiarity, conferred powers) and techniques used by the European Courts, the institutions, and the Member States to extend or contain EU law.

Suggested Citation

Eckes, Christina, Book Review of Catherine Barnard and Okeoghene Odudu, the Outer Limits of European Union Law (August 2009). European Law Review, pp. 794-796, 2009, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2098519

Christina Eckes (Contact Author)

Amsterdam Centre for European Law and Governance ( email )

Oudemanhuispoort 4-6
1012 CN Amsterdam
Netherlands

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