How Perceptions of Temporal Distance Influence Satiation

Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Forthcoming

37 Pages Posted: 5 Jul 2012 Last revised: 29 Jan 2014

Jeff Galak

Carnegie Mellon University

Joseph P. Redden

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Department of Marketing and Logistics Management

Yang Yang

University of Florida

Ellie Kyung

Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth

Date Written: January 28, 2014

Abstract

Although people recover from satiation with the natural passage of time, we examine whether it is possible to influence the recovery process merely by changing the perceived temporal distance from past consumption. Experiment 1, a field experiment, demonstrates that influencing the perceived temporal distance from dinner-goers’ last meal affects the caloric value of the meal purchased (more recent leads to smaller food purchase). In a lab environment controlling for objective temporal distance and initial satiation, Experiment 2 demonstrates that these changes in perceived temporal distance also affect the actual enjoyment of an experience (listening to a favored song). Beyond these reconstructed temporal judgments, Experiment 3 directly manipulates the perceived length of the intervening period since last consumption using an altered time clock, and replicates these effects on satiation. Our findings illustrate that simple manipulations of subjective time perception can influence consumption, even in the presence of very real physiological inputs, and provide further insight into how satiation is constructed.

Keywords: satiation, habituation, adaptation, obesity

Suggested Citation

Galak, Jeff and Redden, Joseph P. and Yang, Yang and Kyung, Ellie, How Perceptions of Temporal Distance Influence Satiation (January 28, 2014). Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2100584 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2100584

Jeff Galak (Contact Author)

Carnegie Mellon University ( email )

Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
United States
412-268-5810 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.jeffgalak.com

Joseph P. Redden

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Department of Marketing and Logistics Management ( email )

271 19th Avenue South
Room 1235 Mgt. Econ. Building
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States

Yang Yang

University of Florida ( email )

PO Box 117165, 201 Stuzin Hall
Gainesville, FL 32610-0496
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/yy1/

Ellie Kyung

Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth ( email )

Hanover, NH 03755
United States

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