Law of Police Interrogation

in G.J.N. Bruinsma & D.L. Weisburd, eds., Encyclopedia of Criminology & Criminal Justice (Springer 2013).

Univ. of San Francisco Law Research Paper

6 Pages Posted: 12 Jul 2012 Last revised: 24 Jun 2014

George C. Thomas

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Rutgers Law School

Richard A. Leo

University of San Francisco - School of Law

Date Written: 2012

Abstract

This essay traces the history of the law of police interrogation in the United States, emphasizing that this body of law is largely a product of United States Supreme Court cases interpreting the United States Constitution. The essay reviews the three sections of the Constitution that regulate interrogation practices: the Fifth Amendment, the Due Process Clause of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments, and the Sixth Amendment. The essay also explores the Court’s major interrogation-related decisions under each of these constitutional provisions.

Keywords: police interrogation, constitutional law, criminal procedure, Fifth Amendment, Sixth Amendment, Fourteenth Amendment

Suggested Citation

Thomas, George C. and Leo, Richard A., Law of Police Interrogation (2012). in G.J.N. Bruinsma & D.L. Weisburd, eds., Encyclopedia of Criminology & Criminal Justice (Springer 2013).; Univ. of San Francisco Law Research Paper . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2104420

George C. Thomas

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Rutgers Law School ( email )

NJ
United States

Richard A. Leo (Contact Author)

University of San Francisco - School of Law ( email )

2130 Fulton Street
San Francisco, CA 94117
United States

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