The Friendly Skies: Mobility and International Conflict

34 Pages Posted: 14 Jul 2012 Last revised: 5 May 2013

See all articles by Philip B.K. Potter

Philip B.K. Potter

University of Virginia - Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics

Date Written: 2013

Abstract

Most empirical research linking globalization and conflict focuses on democracy and trade, but these are just two factors in a broad array of changes to the international system since World War II. Key among these are unprecedented shifts in the extent of interaction across borders, most notably in terms of mobility. Drawing on an original dataset of all international air traffic, I find that the United States resorts to force less often in high mobility relationships than it does in low mobility ones. I then generalize this finding by demonstrating a substantial negative relationship between international transit and multiple measures of interstate conflict between all states. These findings suggest a novel way of accounting for the underlying affinities and aversions between states in models of international conflict and the use of force. They also offer preliminary indications of a secondary mechanism that might contribute to the maintenance of the “liberal peace.”

Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2106761

Keywords: Mobility, Globalization, Liberal Peace, Conflict

Suggested Citation

Potter, Philip B.K., The Friendly Skies: Mobility and International Conflict (2013). APSA 2012 Annual Meeting Paper, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2106761 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2106761

Philip B.K. Potter (Contact Author)

University of Virginia - Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics ( email )

PO Box 400787
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22904
United States

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