World History and the Evolving International Judiciary

57 Pages Posted: 16 Jul 2012 Last revised: 1 Sep 2015

See all articles by Karen J. Alter

Karen J. Alter

Northwestern University - Department of Political Science; University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Law - iCourts Center of Excellence

Date Written: 2012

Abstract

This chapter explains how the end of WWII, the Cold War and the end of the Cold War have shaped the international judiciary, generating an ‘embedded' approach to international law enforcement. I continue the focus on the international judiciary as a whole, highlighting how developments in one region and domain affect developments in similar and distant regimes. The evolutionary approach of this chapter suggests that judicial authority evolves through practice and takes time, and that the overall international political context and parallel institutions shape the development of individual ICs.

Keywords: International Law, International Courts, Human Rights, Trade, War Crimes

Suggested Citation

Alter, Karen J., World History and the Evolving International Judiciary (2012). APSA 2012 Annual Meeting Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2108714

Karen J. Alter (Contact Author)

Northwestern University - Department of Political Science ( email )

601 University Place
Evanston, IL 60208
United States

University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Law - iCourts Center of Excellence ( email )

Karen Blixens Plads 16
Copenhagen, DK-2300
Denmark

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