Law Schools and Disabled Faculty: Toward a Meaningful Opportunity to Teach

Journal of Legal Education, Vol. 41, p. 351, 1991

4 Pages Posted: 20 Sep 2012

See all articles by Stephen L. Mikochik

Stephen L. Mikochik

Ave Maria School of Law; Temple University James E. Beasley School of Law

Date Written: October 23, 1991

Abstract

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 promised that federal funds would no longer be used to support discrimination against disabled people. Today, Two-thirds of all disabled Americans between the age of 16 and 64 are not working at all. Translated into absolute terms, this means that about 8.2 million people with disabilities want to work but cannot find a job. And, sadly, disabled people cannot find a job in law schools. Of the 6,555 faculty members at ABA-accredited law schools, only 85 are reported by their deans as disabled. Only 16 faculty members identified themselves as disabled. These statistics illustrate that two decades after the passage of the Rehabilitation Act, disabled people remain grossly underrepresented on law faculties. Saddest of all, the problem is barely acknowledged.

Keywords: law schools, disabled faculty, Rehabilitation Act

Suggested Citation

Mikochik, Stephen L. and Mikochik, Stephen L., Law Schools and Disabled Faculty: Toward a Meaningful Opportunity to Teach (October 23, 1991). Journal of Legal Education, Vol. 41, p. 351, 1991, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2115942

Stephen L. Mikochik (Contact Author)

Temple University James E. Beasley School of Law ( email )

1719 N. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States
215-204-8962 (Phone)
215-204-1185 (Fax)

Ave Maria School of Law ( email )

1025 Commons Circle
Naples, FL 34119
United States

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