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We are Who We Thought We Were: Congress' Authority to Recognize a Native Hawaiian Polity United by Common Descent

47 Pages Posted: 9 Aug 2012  

Derek H Kauanoe

University of Hawaii at Manoa - William S. Richardson School of Law

Breann Swann Nuuhiwa

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: May 11, 2012

Abstract

In an attempt to fulfill the federal government’s moral imperative, the United States Congress has spent more than a decade considering several proposed versions of the Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act (colloquially referred to as the “Akaka Bill”), which seeks to restore a small measure of Native Hawaiian self-governing authority by providing a process for the formal federal acknowledgment of a reorganized Native Hawaiian governing entity. The proposed Act changes significantly with each new Congress, but from its initial introduction in 2000 to the present, the Act has consistently required that the initial reorganization of the Native Hawaiian polity be carried out by the Native Hawaiian community, united by common Native Hawaiian descent without regard to blood quantum.

Keywords: Sovereignty, Native Hawaiian, Congress, federal recognition, Akaka Bill

Suggested Citation

Kauanoe, Derek H and Swann Nuuhiwa, Breann, We are Who We Thought We Were: Congress' Authority to Recognize a Native Hawaiian Polity United by Common Descent (May 11, 2012). Asian-Pacific Law & Policy Journal, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2012. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2126441

Derek Hoohauoli Kauanoe (Contact Author)

University of Hawaii at Manoa - William S. Richardson School of Law ( email )

2515 Dole Street
Honolulu, HI 96822-2350
United States

HOME PAGE: http://law.hawaii.edu/personnel/kauanoe/derek

Breann Swann Nuuhiwa

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

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