Over the Borderline — A Review of Margaret Price’s Mad at School: Rhetorics of Mental Disability in Academic Life

42 Pages Posted: 9 Aug 2012 Last revised: 25 Mar 2013

Gregory M. Duhl

William Mitchell College of Law

Date Written: March 16, 2013

Abstract

This essay is about “madness” in higher education. In Mad at School: Rhetorics of Mental Disability in Academic Life, Professor Price analyzes the rhetoric and discourse surrounding mental disabilities in academia. In this essay, I place Price’s work in a legal context, suggesting why the Americans with Disabilities Act fails those with mental illness and why reform is needed to protect them. My own narrative as a law professor with Borderline Personality Disorder frames my critique. Narratives of mental illness are important because they help connect those who are often stigmatized and isolated due to mental illness and provide a framework for them to overcome barriers limiting their equal participation in academic life.

Keywords: book review, ADA, Americans with Disabilities Act, mental illness, mental disability, academia, law school

Suggested Citation

Duhl, Gregory M., Over the Borderline — A Review of Margaret Price’s Mad at School: Rhetorics of Mental Disability in Academic Life (March 16, 2013). Loyola University Chicago Law Journal, Vol. 44, 2013; William Mitchell Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2012-09. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2126850 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2126850

Gregory M. Duhl (Contact Author)

William Mitchell College of Law ( email )

875 Summit Ave
St. Paul, MN 55105-3076
United States
(651) 290-6409 (Phone)

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