The Continuing Functions of Article 98 of the Rome Statute

Goettingen Journal of International Law 4 (2012) 1, 131-151

21 Pages Posted: 11 Aug 2012

See all articles by Jens Iverson

Jens Iverson

Leiden University - Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies

Date Written: 2012

Abstract

According to the current jurisprudence of the International Criminal Court, Article 98 of the Rome Statute does not forbid the issuance of an arrest warrant for a sitting head of state. The African Union Commission vehemently objects to this reading of Article 98. Because it viewed the function of Article 98 as forbidding such arrest warrants, it views the current jurisprudence as effectively reading Article 98 out of the Statute, with no continuing function. This article demonstrates the continuing function of Article 98. This continuing function includes immunities resulting from agreements under Article 98(2), as well as customary immunities pertaining to property, persons, diplomatic immunity, and state immunity. Countering the rhetoric and providing a close analysis of the current state of Article 98 in ICC jurisprudence is useful, both with respect to understanding the current operation of Article 98 and to reflect on balancing multiple maximands of criminal law, human rights law, and the international law of immunity.

Keywords: Article 98, Rome Statute, ICC, International Criminal Court, African Union, Immunity, State Immunity, Head of State Immunity, Diplomatic Immunity

Suggested Citation

Iverson, Jens, The Continuing Functions of Article 98 of the Rome Statute (2012). Goettingen Journal of International Law 4 (2012) 1, 131-151. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2127593

Jens Iverson (Contact Author)

Leiden University - Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies ( email )

Leiden University Law Faculty
P.O. Box 9520
Leiden, 2300 RA
Netherlands

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