Embodied Responsibilities: Pregnancy in the Eyes of Japanese Ob-Gyns

Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 251–274, March 2007

24 Pages Posted: 16 Aug 2012 Last revised: 28 Aug 2012

See all articles by Tsipy Ivry

Tsipy Ivry

University of Haifa - Department of Sociology & Anthropology

Date Written: March 16, 2007

Abstract

This article explores the correlation between the social, cultural and political setting in which Japanese women gestate their babies and the kind of maternal responsibilities they are expected to exercise. By focusing on prenatal care, I look at ways in which Japanese gynecologists formulate ideas about women's accountability for pregnancy outcomes and show how these ideas shape the practical strategies through which pregnancy is managed in medical institutions. While interrogating the perspectives these professionals bring into play, I am interested in the relationships between biomedicine, culture and the embodiment of women's roles. My findings reveal a broad range of physiological phenomena for which women are held accountable and a host of instructions they are expected to follow once they engage in prenatal care. Medical narratives render the pregnant body as the physical and mental environment that creates the foetus and highlights women's behavior and health (rather than genes and chromosomes) as the major factors of foetal health. I show how the embodied mode of maternal responsibilities expected of women is mutually constituted by four interconnected realms of discourse and practice: the medical realm, cultural conceptions of self, national reproductive politics and the gendered division of labor.

Keywords: maternal responsibilities, anthropology of reproduction, pregnancy, ob-gyns, Japanese society

Suggested Citation

Ivry, Tsipy, Embodied Responsibilities: Pregnancy in the Eyes of Japanese Ob-Gyns (March 16, 2007). Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 251–274, March 2007, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2130431

Tsipy Ivry (Contact Author)

University of Haifa - Department of Sociology & Anthropology ( email )

Israel

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