The Crazy Horse Malt Liquor Case: From Tradition to Modernity and Halfway Back

24 Pages Posted: 18 Aug 2012  

Frank Pommersheim

University of South Dakota Law School

Date Written: 2012

Abstract

Tasunke Witko, or Crazy Horse as he is known in English, is a revered nineteenth century warrior and spiritual leader of the Oglala Band of the Lakota (or Sioux) Nation. He is renowned for both his skills as a warrior and his high spiritual concern for the welfare of his people. He also often seems to stand apart as a mysterious, even mystical, individual. His picture was never taken by a photographer. He never went to Washington, D.C. to meet the “white fathers.” He never signed a treaty with the United States government. He never claimed to be a chief or tribal leader. He was ultimately killed in 1877, when he was held captive pursuant to his “surrender” at Camp Robinson in Nebraska. This, too, is shrouded in mystery.

Keywords: Indian law, commercial free speech

Suggested Citation

Pommersheim, Frank, The Crazy Horse Malt Liquor Case: From Tradition to Modernity and Halfway Back (2012). South Dakota Law Review, Vol. 57, p. 42, 2012. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2131375

Frank Pommersheim (Contact Author)

University of South Dakota Law School ( email )

414 E. Clark Street
Vermillion, SD 57069
United States

Paper statistics

Downloads
147
Rank
164,099
Abstract Views
1,230