Changing Crime in Phnom Penh

7 Pages Posted: 28 Aug 2012

See all articles by Roderic Broadhurst

Roderic Broadhurst

Australian National University (ANU); ANU Cybercrime Observatory

Thierry Bouhours

Australian National University (ANU)

Date Written: March 26, 2008

Abstract

Is Phnom Penh more or less dangerous than it was five years ago? Residents and frequent visitors to the city have in recent years noted a more relaxed and peaceful ambience. In the past self-imposed curfews emptied streets early in the evening but has Phnom Penh become as safe as other cities?

All over the world official crime statistics account for only a fraction of crime. Many crimes are not detected or reported to the police. Even when crimes are reported they are not always recorded by the police, although records of serious crimes such as homicide are usually more reliable. Criminologists refer to these unaccounted crimes as the ‘dark figure of crime’. The ‘dark figure’ of unreported crime varies from country to country and partly reflects confidence in police and differences in the severity and frequency of some crimes. Compared to many places in the world Cambodia has one of the lowest rates of reporting crime to the police and thus one of the largest ‘dark figure’ of crime.

Keywords: crime victims, Cambodia, international crime victim survey, fear of crime

Suggested Citation

Broadhurst, Roderic and Bouhours, Thierry, Changing Crime in Phnom Penh (March 26, 2008). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2137387 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2137387

Roderic Broadhurst (Contact Author)

Australian National University (ANU) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601
Australia

ANU Cybercrime Observatory ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia

Thierry Bouhours

Australian National University (ANU) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601
Australia

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