The Minimum Dropout Age and Student Victimization

Andrew Young School of Policy Studies Research Paper Series No. 12-17

W. J. Usery Workplace Research Group Working Paper No. 2012-6-1

22 Pages Posted: 31 Aug 2012

See all articles by D. Mark Anderson

D. Mark Anderson

Montana State University - Bozeman

Benjamin Hansen

University of Oregon - Department of Economics; NBER; IZA

MaryBeth Beth Walker

Georgia State University

Date Written: June 2012

Abstract

Over the years, the legal minimum dropout age has been raised to 18 in 21 states. Although these policy changes are often promoted for their educational benefits, they have also been shown to reduce crimes committed by youths in the affected age groups. However, an unintended consequence of increasing the minimum dropout age could be the displacement of crime and delinquency from the streets to schools. To examine this issue, we use data from the national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys to estimate the relationship between minimum dropout age laws and student victimization. Our results suggest that higher minimum dropout ages increase the likelihood that females and younger students report missing days of school for fear of their safety and that younger students are more likely to report being threatened or injured with a weapon on school property. Our results also yield some evidence that students are more likely to report being victims of in-school theft when the minimum dropout age is higher.

Suggested Citation

Anderson, D. Mark and Hansen, Benjamin and Walker, Mary Beth Beth, The Minimum Dropout Age and Student Victimization (June 2012). Andrew Young School of Policy Studies Research Paper Series No. 12-17, W. J. Usery Workplace Research Group Working Paper No. 2012-6-1, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2138993 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2138993

D. Mark Anderson

Montana State University - Bozeman ( email )

Bozeman, MT 59717-2920
United States

Benjamin Hansen

University of Oregon - Department of Economics ( email )

1285 University of ORegon
Eugene, OR 97403
United States

NBER ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

IZA ( email )

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Mary Beth Beth Walker (Contact Author)

Georgia State University ( email )

35 Broad Street
Atlanta, GA 30302
United States

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