Emigration, Labor Supply, and Earnings in Mexico

57 Pages Posted: 7 Sep 2012

See all articles by Gordon H. Hanson

Gordon H. Hanson

University of California, San Diego (UCSD) - Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IRPS); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: June 2005

Abstract

In this paper, I examine changes in labor supply and earnings across regions of Mexico during the 1990s. I focus the analysis on individuals born in states with either high-exposure or low-exposure to emigration, as measured by historical data on state migration to the United States. During the 1990s, rates of external migration and interval migration were higher among individuals born in high-migration states. Consistent with positive selection of emigrants in terms of observable skill, emigration rates appear to be highest among individuals with earnings in the top half of the wage distribution. Controlling for regional differences in observable characteristics and for initial regional differences in earnings, the distribution of male earnings in high-migration states shifted to the right relative to low-migration states. Over the decade, average hourly earnings in high-migration states rose relative to low-migration states by 6-9%.

Suggested Citation

Hanson, Gordon H., Emigration, Labor Supply, and Earnings in Mexico (June 2005). NBER Working Paper No. w11412. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2143063

Gordon H. Hanson (Contact Author)

University of California, San Diego (UCSD) - Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IRPS) ( email )

9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0519
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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