National Security Law in China

21 Pages Posted: 13 Sep 2012

See all articles by Fu Hualing

Fu Hualing

The University of Hong Kong - Faculty of Law

Richard Cullen

The University of Hong Kong - Faculty of Law

Date Written: 1996

Abstract

All nations, regardless of political persuasion, generally draft quite drastic provisions to protect national security interests. In 1993, the People's Republic of China (PRC) introduced a new National Security Law (NSL). The NSL is administered by the Ministry of National Security. There were hopes that the codification of the law on national security would be a step towards a clearer and more fair regime for protecting such interests in the PRC. Experience so far has not borne out these hopes. The efforts of the National People's Congress (the PRC Parliament) in providing a clearer and somewhat more limited statement of what constitutes threats to national security have been undermined by the NSL implementing authorities, especially through the use of subsidiary regulations. Moreover, the accountability mechanisms applying to the implementing authorities remain feeble.

Suggested Citation

Hualing, Fu and Cullen, Richard, National Security Law in China (1996). Columbia Journal of Transnational Law, Vol. 34, p. 449, 1996, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2145192

Fu Hualing

The University of Hong Kong - Faculty of Law ( email )

Pokfulam Road
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
China

HOME PAGE: http://hub.hku.hk/rp/rp01245

Richard Cullen (Contact Author)

The University of Hong Kong - Faculty of Law ( email )

Pokfulam Road
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
China

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