GPS Monitoring and More: Criminal Law Cases in the Supreme Court’s 2011-12 Term

14 Pages Posted: 15 Sep 2012  

Charles D. Weisselberg

University of California, Berkeley - School of Law

Date Written: September 10, 2012

Abstract

This article examines some of the most notable criminal-law-related opinions of the Supreme Court’s 2011-12 Term, focusing on those decisions that have the greatest impact upon the states.

Without a doubt, the past Term was "big." The headline on the civil side of the docket was the Affordable Care Act decision. The blockbuster on the criminal side was United States v. Jones, the Global Positioning System (GPS) monitoring case. In Jones, the Court showed that some old things can be new again — the justices gave us “new” ways of thinking about Fourth Amendment searches. There were other key criminal-law rulings as well, including on effective assistance and plea negotiations, confrontation, juries and criminal fines, juvenile life-without-parole sentences, and double jeopardy. And as in the previous Term, the Court issued several opinions emphasizing the deference to be afforded state courts on federal habeas corpus review. The article concludes with a brief preview of the 2012-2013 Term.

Keywords: Supreme Court, criminal law, criminal procedure, Fourth Amendment, constitutional law

JEL Classification: K14, K40, K41, K42

Suggested Citation

Weisselberg, Charles D., GPS Monitoring and More: Criminal Law Cases in the Supreme Court’s 2011-12 Term (September 10, 2012). 48 Court Review 60 (2012); UC Berkeley Public Law Research Paper No. 2146845. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2146845

Charles D. Weisselberg (Contact Author)

University of California, Berkeley - School of Law ( email )

University of California, Berkeley
School of Law
Berkeley, CA 94720-7200
United States
510-643-8159 (Phone)
510-642-3856 (Fax)

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