Legal Malpractice Litigation and the Duty to Report Misconduct

1 St. Mary's Journal of Legal Malpractice & Ethics 40 (2011)

74 Pages Posted: 18 Sep 2012 Last revised: 3 Oct 2012

See all articles by Vincent R. Johnson

Vincent R. Johnson

Saint Mary's University of San Antonio

Date Written: June 1, 2011

Abstract

Lawyers participating in legal malpractice litigation sometimes encounter evidence of serious disciplinary rule violations. Whether, and how soon, those lawyers are required to report this information to grievance authorities is a question that has received little attention from courts and scholars, despite the fact that most states have mandatory reporting rules. The dilemma for lawyers serving as testifying experts is particularly troublesome because nonreporting may result not only in discipline, but testimonial impeachment. The better view is that an expert in a pending case ordinarily has no mandatory obligation to report misconduct. This conclusion is supported by an analysis of the narrowness of the reporting obligation, the exceptions to the rule, public policy considerations related to malpractice litigation and grievance procedures, and customary professional practices. However, after litigation ends, an expert (and other lawyers) may have a duty to call evidence of serious misconduct to the attention of disciplinary authorities.

Keywords: legal malpractice, legal ethics, professional responsibility, experts, grievances, discipline, duty to report

Suggested Citation

Johnson, Vincent R., Legal Malpractice Litigation and the Duty to Report Misconduct (June 1, 2011). 1 St. Mary's Journal of Legal Malpractice & Ethics 40 (2011), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2148149

Vincent R. Johnson (Contact Author)

Saint Mary's University of San Antonio ( email )

1 Camino Santa Maria
San Antonio, TX 78023
United States
210-431-2131 (Phone)

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