Download this Paper Open PDF in Browser

Toward a Social-Technological System that Inactivates False Rumors Through the Critical Thinking of Crowds

Proceedings of the 46th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-46), 649-658

10 Pages Posted: 22 Sep 2012 Last revised: 3 Apr 2013

Yuko Tanaka

National Institute of Informatics

Yasuaki Sakamoto

AXA Direct Japan

Toshihiko Matsuka

Chiba University

Date Written: September 14, 2012

Abstract

Critical thinking is an important part of media literacy. It allows people to find facts among rumors and to inactivate false information. Such abilities are essential when social media is flooded with rumors during disaster response. We envision a social-technological system in which critical thinking is crowd-sourced: Individuals benefit from others' criticisms of false information, and the system inactivates the spread of false information. To test the plausibility of this system, we examined the effect of exposure to criticisms on people’s decision to spread rumors in social media. When people were exposed to criticisms before rumors, the proportion of responses aimed at stopping the spread of rumors was significantly larger than when people were exposed to rumors before criticisms. We identified some psychological factors that could explain this effect. Based on our results, we discuss practical implications for developing a social-technological system that harnesses the critical thinking of crowds.

Keywords: Information transmission, rumor, critical thinking, crowd, social-technological system, psychology

Suggested Citation

Tanaka, Yuko and Sakamoto, Yasuaki and Matsuka, Toshihiko, Toward a Social-Technological System that Inactivates False Rumors Through the Critical Thinking of Crowds (September 14, 2012). Proceedings of the 46th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-46), 649-658. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2150299 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2150299

Yuko Tanaka (Contact Author)

National Institute of Informatics ( email )

2-1-2 Hitotsubashi
Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo, 1018430
Japan

Yasuaki Sakamoto

AXA Direct Japan ( email )

Japan

Toshihiko Matsuka

Chiba University ( email )

1-33, Yayoi-cho
Inage-ku
Chiba-shi, Chiba, 263-8, 271-8510
Japan

Paper statistics

Downloads
682
Rank
30,633
Abstract Views
2,506