The Spread of Manufacturing to the Periphery 1870-2007: Eight Stylized Facts

88 Pages Posted: 28 Sep 2012

See all articles by Agustín S. Bénétrix

Agustín S. Bénétrix

Trinity College (Dublin)

Kevin O'Rourke

University of Oxford

Jeffrey G. Williamson

Harvard University - Department of Economics, Laird Bell Professor of Economics, Emeritus; Honorary Fellow, University of Wisconsin - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: July 2012

Abstract

This paper documents industrial output growth around the poor periphery (Latin America, the European periphery, the Middle East and North Africa, Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa) between 1870 and 2007. We provide answers to the following questions: When and where did rapid industrial growth begin in the periphery? When and where did peripheral growth rates exceed those in the industrial core? When was the high-point of peripheral industrial growth? When and where did it become widespread? When was the high-point of peripheral convergence on the core? How variable was the growth experience between countries? And how persistent was peripheral industrial growth?

Keywords: history, Third World industrialization

JEL Classification: F1, N7, O2

Suggested Citation

Bénétrix, Agustín and O'Rourke, Kevin and Williamson, Jeffrey G., The Spread of Manufacturing to the Periphery 1870-2007: Eight Stylized Facts (July 2012). CEPR Discussion Paper No. DP9060. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2153511

Agustín Bénétrix (Contact Author)

Trinity College (Dublin) ( email )

2-3 College Green
Dublin, Leinster
Ireland

Kevin O'Rourke

University of Oxford ( email )

Mansfield Road
Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 4AU
United Kingdom

Jeffrey G. Williamson

Harvard University - Department of Economics, Laird Bell Professor of Economics, Emeritus ( email )

Littauer Center
Room 216
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-495-2438 (Phone)
617-496-7352 (Fax)

Honorary Fellow, University of Wisconsin - Department of Economics

716 Langdon Street
Madison, WI 53706-1481
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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