Do Babysitters Have More Kids? The Effects of Teenage Work Experiences on Adult Outcomes

51 Pages Posted: 6 Oct 2012

See all articles by Zeynep Erdogan

Zeynep Erdogan

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Joyce P. Jacobsen

Wesleyan University - Department of Economics

Peter Kooreman

Tilburg University - Center and Faculty of Economics and Business Administration; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Abstract

We examine the work experiences during middle school and high school of U.S. females and males and find that most of the child-oriented work such as babysitting and camp counseling is done by females. If the type of work undertaken while young affects either development of specific human capital or preferences, then these early work experiences may have measurable effects on later life outcomes. This paper examines whether or not having a job as a teenager, and whether or not it is a child-oriented job, causes differences in labor market behavior among young adults. In addition to a set of standard controls, in order to account for the endogeneity of students’ work decisions, we utilize a set of state-level instruments, including state-level child-labor laws and indicators of relative demand for, and supply of, child-oriented workers. While the effects we find are complex and sometimes hard to interpret, they suggest that work in 10th grade has a positive causal effect on later labor market outcomes and delays family formation, but to a lesser extent when jobs were child-oriented.

Keywords: human capital, gender, jobs while in school, labor market, family formation

JEL Classification: J13, J24

Suggested Citation

Erdogan, Zeynep and Jacobsen, Joyce P. and Kooreman, Peter, Do Babysitters Have More Kids? The Effects of Teenage Work Experiences on Adult Outcomes. IZA Discussion Paper No. 6856. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2157998

Zeynep Erdogan (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

Joyce P. Jacobsen

Wesleyan University - Department of Economics ( email )

238 Church Street
Middletown, CT 06459-0007
United States

Peter Kooreman

Tilburg University - Center and Faculty of Economics and Business Administration ( email )

P.O. Box 90153
Tilburg, 5000 LE
Netherlands

HOME PAGE: http://www.peterkooreman.nl

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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