Promotion and Wages in Mid-Career: Gender, Unionism, and Sector

47 Pages Posted: 7 Oct 2012

See all articles by John T. Addison

John T. Addison

University of South Carolina - Moore School of Business - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Orgul D. Ozturk

University of South Carolina - Moore School of Business - Department of Economics

Si Wang

Hunan University

Abstract

This paper considers the role of gender in the promotion process and the impact of promotion on wages and wage growth, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79). Its focus is upon mid-career promotion and wages, thereby complementing extant studies of the NLSY that relate to differences between men and women at an earlier stage in their careers. The paper is further differentiated from these studies and the wider promotions literature in paying especial attention to the role of unionism and the public sector. It is reported that mid-career females are more likely than males to be promoted in the private sector (and no less likely in the public sector); that wages are increasing in promotion, and the effect is generally higher for females; and that female wage growth from contemporaneous promotion is almost as high as that for males the private sector and much higher in the public sector. These rather positive results for females represent in most cases an improvement over the early-career findings but in mid-career the mediating influence of unionism is more negative, and not just for females.

Keywords: mid-career, early career, promotion, wages, wage growth, gender, unionism, public sector

JEL Classification: J16, J31, J51, J62

Suggested Citation

Addison, John T. and Ozturk, Orgul D. and Wang, Si, Promotion and Wages in Mid-Career: Gender, Unionism, and Sector. IZA Discussion Paper No. 6873. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2158283

John T. Addison (Contact Author)

University of South Carolina - Moore School of Business - Department of Economics ( email )

The Francis M. Hipp Building
1705 College Street
Columbia, SC 29208
United States
803-777-7400 (Phone)
803-777-6876 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://mooreschool.sc.edu/moore/economics/profiles/addison.htm

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Orgul D. Ozturk

University of South Carolina - Moore School of Business - Department of Economics ( email )

The Francis M. Hipp Building
1705 College Street
Columbia, SC 29208
United States

Si Wang

Hunan University

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