Brief Review of World Demographic Trends: Explaining Population Trends: Birth, Death and Migration

Global Social Change Research Project, October 2012

24 Pages Posted: 18 Oct 2012 Last revised: 23 Nov 2012

See all articles by Gene Shackman

Gene Shackman

The Global Social Change Research Project

Xun Wang

University of Wisconsin, Parkside - Department of Sociology/Anthropology

Ya-Lin Liu

The Global Social Change Research Project

Date Written: October 17, 2012

Abstract

In summary, the population in most regions is still increasing, because there are still more births than deaths. Europe is the exception in that there are more deaths than births in the last decade. However, population in Europe is still increasing, because net migration - into Europe - is larger than the difference between deaths and births.

Second, net population change is higher in Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean and Sub-Saharan Africa than in the other regions, largely because births in those areas are higher than births in other areas. The higher net population change in Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean and Sub-Saharan Africa corresponds to their higher population growth rates, and so their increasing percentage of the world population (see previous report).

Finally, in Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean, births have been declining. So while the population is still growing, it is growing more slowly. Births are still increasing in Africa and so net population growth is still increasing. In Europe, in the last 5 year period, deaths are declining and births are increasing, so population growth has been increasing in the past 5 year period. In Northern America, net population change has had very little change recently and so population growth in Northern America has also been very small.

Keywords: population, birth, death, migration

JEL Classification: J11

Suggested Citation

Shackman, Gene and Wang, Xun and Liu, Ya-Lin, Brief Review of World Demographic Trends: Explaining Population Trends: Birth, Death and Migration (October 17, 2012). Global Social Change Research Project, October 2012, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2163196 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2163196

Gene Shackman (Contact Author)

The Global Social Change Research Project ( email )

Albany, NY 12203
United States

HOME PAGE: http://independent.academia.edu/GeneShackman

Xun Wang

University of Wisconsin, Parkside - Department of Sociology/Anthropology ( email )

900 Wood Road
P.O. Box 2000
Parkside, WI 53141-2000
United States

Ya-Lin Liu

The Global Social Change Research Project ( email )

Albany, NY 12203
United States

HOME PAGE: http://gsociology.icaap.org

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