Sonic City: The Evolving Economic Geography of the Music Industry

Florida, R. and Jackson, S. (2010) Sonic City: The Evolving Economic Geography of the Music Industry, Journal of Planning Education and Research vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 310-321, DOI: 10.1177/0739456X09354453

13 Pages Posted: 24 Jan 2014

See all articles by Richard Florida

Richard Florida

Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto; New York University (NYU)

Scott Jackson

United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

Date Written: December 21, 2009

Abstract

Our research tracks the location of musicians and music establishments in U.S. regions from 1970 to 2004. We find that the music industry has become significantly more concentrated over time. New York and Los Angeles remain dominant locations, with Nashville emerging as a third major center.This reflects the economic and artistic advantages of large markets.We also find evidence of the persistence of musicians and music scenes in some smaller locations throughout the United States.This reflects demand for music in some small locations with more affluent, higher-human capital populations, location-specific assets, and technological changes that have lowered the costs for producing, distributing, and consuming music across locations.

Keywords: music, economic geography, scenes, clusters, Nashville

Suggested Citation

Florida, Richard and Jackson, Scott, Sonic City: The Evolving Economic Geography of the Music Industry (December 21, 2009). Florida, R. and Jackson, S. (2010) Sonic City: The Evolving Economic Geography of the Music Industry, Journal of Planning Education and Research vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 310-321, DOI: 10.1177/0739456X09354453, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2175348

Richard Florida (Contact Author)

Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto ( email )

105 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E6 M5S1S4
Canada

New York University (NYU)

Bobst Library, E-resource Acquisitions
20 Cooper Square 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10003-711
United States

Scott Jackson

United States Agency for International Development (USAID) ( email )

1300 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20577
United States

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