Alternative Energy in American Indian Country: Catering to Both Sides of the Coin

18 Pages Posted: 28 Nov 2012 Last revised: 22 Jul 2014

Date Written: November 27, 2012

Abstract

This article looks at both sides of the renewable energy “coin” in relation to American Indian country. On the one side, it appears that tribal governments are opposed to any energy development on their lands. All told, however, this couldn’t be further from the truth – tribes merely seek a seat at the table when decisions are made regarding developments that will adversely affect their lands and/or areas of cultural significance. Indeed, contrary to being opposed to alternative energy development, tribes are very actively seeking to develop their lands in a manner that is consistent with their cultures and traditions. But, large-scale alternative energy projects are virtually absent from Indian country. This article argues that the oft-overlooked other side of the renewable energy “coin” are the federal regulations that hinder these projects from coming to fruition. The final section of the article will discuss what Congress is – and is not – doing regarding the two sides of this “coin.”

Suggested Citation

Dreveskracht, Ryan D., Alternative Energy in American Indian Country: Catering to Both Sides of the Coin (November 27, 2012). Energy Law Journal, Vol. 33, 2012. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2181769

Ryan D. Dreveskracht (Contact Author)

University of Washington ( email )

Seattle, WA 98195
United States

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