Response to Philip Blosser

St. Paul, the Natural Law, and Contemporary Legal Theory, Jane Adolphe, Robert Fastiggi and Michael Vacca, eds., Lexington Books, March 2012

13 Pages Posted: 30 Nov 2012

See all articles by Joseph M. Isanga

Joseph M. Isanga

Concordia University School of Law

Date Written: March 22, 2012

Abstract

Jurisprudential· theories provide frameworks for understanding the nature of law and justice. Generally exclusivist, each portrays itself as the only valid explanation of law. Thus, legal positivism' portrays itself as antithetical to natural law theory. Legal positivism developed in different directions and inspired a variety ofkindred theories, such as legalism/formalism, legal realism, and legal process. In tum, these ideas attempted to monopolize legal theory, usually at the expense of natural law theory. To an extent, this is understandable because every generation confronts unique challenges, and in crafting solutions, prior theories seem outdated as they relate to different times and problems.

Suggested Citation

Isanga, Joseph, Response to Philip Blosser (March 22, 2012). St. Paul, the Natural Law, and Contemporary Legal Theory, Jane Adolphe, Robert Fastiggi and Michael Vacca, eds., Lexington Books, March 2012, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2182646

Joseph Isanga (Contact Author)

Concordia University School of Law ( email )

501 W. Front St
Boise, ID 83702
United States
208-639-5411 (Phone)

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
19
Abstract Views
290
PlumX Metrics