Implications of the Capital-Embodiment Revolution for Directed R&D and Wage Inequality

FRB Richmond Economic Quarterly, Vol. 89, No. 4, Fall 2003, pp. 25-50

26 Pages Posted: 5 Dec 2012

See all articles by Andreas Hornstein

Andreas Hornstein

Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond

Per Krusell

Princeton University - Department of Economics; Stockholm University - Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Date Written: 2003

Abstract

The skill premium — the wage of skilled labor relative to the wage of unskilled labor — has increased substantially in the United States since the 1970s. The higher skill premium has been attributed to skill-biased factor-specific technical change or to capital accumulation when skilled labor is relatively more complementary to capital than is unskilled labor. The authors describe an economic mechanism through which factor-specific technical change and capital accumulation respond to changes in the rate of capital-embodied technical change, and they trace out how accelerated capital-embodied technical change increases the skill premium in the medium and long run.

Suggested Citation

Hornstein, Andreas and Krusell, Per L., Implications of the Capital-Embodiment Revolution for Directed R&D and Wage Inequality (2003). FRB Richmond Economic Quarterly, Vol. 89, No. 4, Fall 2003, pp. 25-50. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2184910

Andreas Hornstein (Contact Author)

Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond ( email )

P.O. Box 27622
Richmond, VA 23261
United States
804-697-8266 (Phone)
804-697-8255 (Fax)

Per L. Krusell

Princeton University - Department of Economics ( email )

111 Fisher Hall
Princeton, NJ
United States
609-258-4003 (Phone)
609-258-6419 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://rincewind.iies.su.se/%7Ekrusell/

Stockholm University - Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES) ( email )

Stockholm, SE-10691
Sweden
+46 0 8 16 30 73 (Phone)
+46 0 8 16 41 77 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://rincewind.iies.su.se/%7Ekrusell/

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

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